Skip to main content

Book Spotlight: Teera: A Life of Hope and Fulfillment | Teera de Fonseka

Genre: Memoir
Paperback: 234 pages 
Perspective: First Person
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (February 22, 2015) 
Language: English 


SYNOPSIS:

Teera’s life was beautiful. Having grown up in the splendor of a beachside paradise, Teera settled down in a good home with the love of her life and their two gorgeous children. Filled with love, joy, and a promising future, Teera’s world was nearly perfect, until the night her husband was violently murdered while the two of them lay in bed sleeping. The assailant intended to kill her too, but Teera survived. Devastated by loss and disfigured from a gruesome facial wound, her infants still to care for, Teera learned to endure and to carry on. Yet the murder was only the beginning. It would be years before Teera escaped the turmoil she faced in Sri Lanka, finding refuge for her family in a far away land. This is Teera’s life of hope and fulfillment, a declaration of faith and of love. Honest, inspiring and heart-rending, Teera’s is an incredible saga set against an enchanting tropical landscape tainted by bloodshed and betrayal.

EXCERPT:

Sri Lanka was not always a place to escape from. In many ways, I wish I never had to leave. But I did, and that’s another story that I’m only beginning to address. When I was growing up, Sri Lanka was paradise. It was home, and I didn’t know anything outside of the little teardrop-shaped island off the coast of India that we called Ceylon. 

It is customary where I come from to name the home that your family resides in. A lot of families would proudly display the name of their first-born son somewhere near the door. Others would display religious tributes or anything else that might be relevant to their household. My family’s home has a wooden sign with the name “Sea Breeze” carved into it, a tribute to both the ocean we lived on, and the safe serenity that home granted our family. 

NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR:

I don't have any rituals when it comes to my writing. I write whenever inspiration compels me. I want my writing to be natural and unforced. 

When I am not writing, I like to read, take long walks, and watch inspirational TV programs. I also listen to  spiritual leaders like Joel Osteen and Joyce Meyer. They have brought a positive energy into my life. 

Additionally, I love listening to music and volunteering where ever my help is needed. I used to multitask, but these days I have learned to slowdown and do one thing at a time. 

I am grateful for the opportunity to be able to do something I love doing. I enjoy writing very much and found writing to be a great hobby to keep the mind alert. It is a great way to meditate, search the heart and soul. 

I don't have a tool to measure the success of a writer but I am convinced that a writer must have the courage to tell the truth, be ready to be silly, but clever and some who is willingly open to learn the simple and effective tools to complete the project with joy.

I can honestly say that finally life makes sense.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Teera de Fonseka is a mother, a grandmother, and a writer living in Los Angeles, California. In her free time she enjoys reading, writing and walking her dog, Tigger. Writing especially has become a hobby for Teera in recent years, as she has worked to publish her memoirs. She loves to spend her days, as she puts it, “writing her heart out.”

Writing has brought Teera a great deal of peace and she wants to encourage others to write their hearts out too. She hopes that her story can touch and inspire others. After having had a chance to tell her tale, Teera wants to keep helping people. She finds inspiration in the talent that she sees in the people around her. She wants to encourage these people to do everything that they can with these talents, and to live up to their potential; to trust in God’s plan for them.





Popular posts from this blog

El Deafo | Cece Bell

And being different? That turned out to the best part of all. I found that with a little creativity, and a lot of dedication, any difference can be turned into something amazing. Our differences are our superpowers.”
Genre: Middle Grade Graphic Novel/Memoir. Number of Pages: 233. Perspective: First. Location: Virginia.
This graphic novel follows the author throughout her time as a young girl in the 1970s and her experiences losing her hearing from meningitis at the age of four. She learns how to make friends and accept herself. For a complete summary, you can go here.
This was a beautiful story about someone who copes with becoming deaf. I took an American Sign Language course in college and we talked a lot about the deaf culture; it was interesting to learn about some of the daily challenges that someone who is deaf faces. This book explains those challenges in a way that children can understand and relate to. We have come a long way with accessibility since the 70s, but we all could use …

5 Reasons Why I Hate Book Series

Many of you know that I hate book series. If at all possible, I try to stick to stand-alone novels. A few rare trilogies land on my bookshelf and an even rarer few get a good review. Here are my reasons why I hate trilogies: 

1. The first book is perfected.

Authors have an unlimited amount of time to perfect the first book. They may have many rewrites and rejections before it is finally accepted by a publisher. By that point, the book should be pristine. The author may not have a deal with the publisher for a series yet, but once the first book proves its worth, the publisher will definitely ask for the rest of the series. Depending on the popularity, the author will be forced to get the next books out quickly—unless you are George R.R. Martin. There will be less time to perfect the story and it will be sent out without many rewrites, as to appease the fan-base. As a result, the rest of the series suffers in comparison to the debut. 
2. The waiting is torture. 

Part of the reason why the …

Hex | Thomas Olde Heuvelt

“Whoever is born here, is doomed to stay 'til death. Whoever settles, never leaves."
Genre: Horror. Number of Pages: 384. Perspective: Third. Location: New York.
Hex is the story of a town that is cursed by a witch with her eyes and mouth sewn shut. She shows up in houses and just stands and stares for days at a time. The people of the town can never leave and are plagued by the fear of what would happen if the witch’s eyes and mouth are ever opened. For a complete summary, you can go here.
This book started off kind of funny and light-hearted. The middle starts to get a little creepy and suspenseful, and the end is downright strange. It was an enjoyable book, but you’ll have to wait a long time for the climax. The bulk of the action happens in the last 50 pages. For me, that felt rushed and left me with more questions than answers. 
Hex was originally written in Dutch and translated to English. With that in mind, I am utterly impressed with the flow and readability of the story. Th…

Ten Things Writers Need to Know

This is a guest post by Heather Weidner. I was asked recently what advice I would give to someone who wants to write. Here’s my list…
1. Read. Read. Read. 

Read everything you can get your hands on. Learn about the genre. Learn about techniques and style. See what works and what doesn't.



2. Seek out writers like you. 

Find a writers' group. I write mysteries, so Sisters in Crime was a perfect fit. I am also in the online community, Guppies. They have tons of resources and advice. And they are so supportive and helpful. 
3. There are a lot of books out there on the craft of writing. 
My favorite is Stephen King's On Writing. Invest in books that help you. But use your library too. FREE is good.



4. If you are serious about writing, find a critique group. 
It's an investment in your time to read the submissions. Make sure that the feedback is helpful. Critiques need to be constructive and not personal. My critique group specializes in mysteries and crime fiction. And that works fo…

5 Things I Would Have Done Differently Before Self-Publishing

This is a guest post by Mark Benjamin. 
About three-quarters into 2015, I decided to self-publish. My novel was stuck in that phase of completed / nearly done, and I had been agent shopping for three years prior, and the brief thought (if at all) of self-publishing had been pushed out of my mind by the traditional method. That is, until my wife, Lucy, sent me the Amazon Kindle Publishing link. At the end of May 2016, my debut novel, A CHANGE OF HEART, Book One of The Royal Blood Chronicles, was released, an urban fantasy novel bringing back vampires from whence I first found them, cue in Lestat and Louis. There was a lot to learn throughout the entire self-publishing process; emotions ranging from doubt to hope, anxiety to determination, fear to belief. I would like to share my experiences, then and now, and how I would have done things differently.


1. Just Do It
Those three words are the beginning and end of it all. The story hit me and I ran with it. I could have waited until I thought …

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required