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Saturday, September 30, 2017

The Nix | Nathan Hill

“The flip side of being a person who never fails at anything is that you never do anything you could fail at. You never do anything risky. There’s a certain essential lack of courage among people who seem to be good at everything.” 

Genre: Literary/Historical Fiction.
Number of Pages: 628.
Perspective: Alternating Third.
Location: Rural Pennsylvania. 

This book is about a writer who sees his mother on the news for stoning a politician. Since he hasn’t seen her since he was a child and needs a book concept, he decides to write a tell-all and uncover all the secrets of his mother’s past. For a complete summary, you can go here.

Overall, I enjoyed the book. It utilized the true definition of character development. Some of the backstories I loved and others felt unnecessary. I  didn't think the video gamer he befriended was necessary to the book. But as a short story, it would have been really interesting and it did provide a great perspective. I kept waiting and waiting for it all to tie together. I wasn't super thrilled with how it all lined up, but it was at least a somewhat satisfying ending. I think some of the backstories and characters could have been cut out to make the book shorter. It was entertaining, but so long. I kept getting distracted by faster reads.

Obviously, the story is called the Nix, which refers to a mythical spirit. I personally didn't like the folklore aspect. I think it took away from the realism of the rest of the story. I do think this book is worth the read, especially if you are a writer and need help learning the proper way to achieve character development. But this is not a book for occasional readers. This is a full-time commitment type of book. You need to read until the end to really see the full picture. If you are interested in buying the book, you can buy it here. After you have read it, leave a comment and let me know what you think! 





“Sometimes we’re so wrapped up in our own story that we don’t see how we’re supporting characters in someone else’s”


4/5 Stars