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Showing posts from October, 2017

Without Merit | Colleen Hoover

Not every mistake deserves a consequence. Sometimes the only thing it deserves is forgiveness.”
Genre: Young Adult. Number of Pages: 384. Perspective: First. Location: Texas.
This book follows the dysfunctional Voss family told from 17-year-old Merit’s perspective. She is holding on to a lot of secrets for members of her family, but she may not be seeing the full picture. For a complete summary, you can go here.
First of all, any book that I can read in one day (and practically one sitting) has to be pretty good. The way Hoover writes just flows so well. All of her books suck you in and are quick reads because you just want to devour the book. They usually have some twists, but you never feel like you have to think too hard or slow down to piece everything together. I even gave it my Best Book Award (I am on a roll with good books this week!).
My favorite part about this book is that it discusses perception and that we make a lot of assumptions about people. I also like how it makes us awar…

All The Missing Girls | Megan Miranda

There is nothing more dangerous, nothing more powerful, nothing more necessary and essential for survival than the lies we tell ourselves.”
Genre: Mystery Thriller. Number of Pages: 384. Perspective: First. Location: Cooley Ridge, North Carolina.
This book follows Nic, a woman who returns to her hometown to help her aging dad with dementia. Going back opens old wounds and mysteries, especially once a second girl goes missing, ten years after the first mysterious disappearance. Everyone has their secrets, but which ones are hiding murder(s)? For a complete summary, you can go here.
Wow! Probably my favorite thriller of the year! I even gave it my Best Book Award! The format was unique (it took place primarily over fifteen days and was told in reverse chronological order). Now I want to read it all over again to catch all the clues I missed! It was a little frustrating at first, and it does take some brainpower to piece everything together -- but doesn't that add to the excitement of sol…

The Hate U Give | Angie Thomas

Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.”
Genre: Young Adult. Number of Pages: 464. Perspective: First.
This book is about Starr, a sixteen-year-old that lives in a poor neighborhood, but attends a fancy suburban private school. One night, her childhood best friend gets shot by a cop while she’s in the car. She is forced to decide if she wants to stand up and be the voice of a movement. For a complete summary, you can go here.
I cannot think of one negative thing to say about this book. I even gave it my Best Book Award! It is very relevant to a lot of racial issues going on in America right now. It is not an anti-white or anti-police book. Instead, it focuses on the challenges of growing up in a poor, predominantly black neighborhood. It does discuss shootings and police brutality, but, again, it is not a book bashing the police. 
I think it is rare to find a book that can clearly explain to a young adult what racism looks…

Lily and the Octopus | Steven Rowley

A heart is judged not by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others.”
Genre: Animal Fiction. Number of Pages: 307. Perspective: First. Location: Los Angeles, California.
This book is about a man's beloved dachshund with a cancerous tumor on his head. The owner, Ted, personifies this tumor as an octopus who is killing his best friend. He will do whatever it takes to fight off the octopus. For a complete summary, you can go here.
At first, my thoughts were: wow, this is a strange book…this guy must be on drugs since he is hallucinating. Then I thought: this book is really sweet and I can understand the deep connection between a person and a dog. Near the end of the book I thought: ok, this guy lost me again…this book got super weird and way over the top. My final thoughts: this book was based on the author’s relationship with his own dog, so I can see how this is cathartic and part of his healing process.
It honestly took me awhile to piece together my feelings about this …

All Grown Up | Jami Attenberg

At some point, you just pull off the Band-Aid, and it hurts, but then it's over and you're relieved.”
Genre: Contemporary Fiction. Number of Pages: 197. Perspective: First. Location: New York City.
This book follows Andrea through a series of short stories. As she reaches her forties, it seems like everyone in her life is growing up and moving on. She is focused on partying, art, and being alone. For a complete summary, you can go here.
All I can think to say is: thank goodness this was a short book. It was an incredibly depressing look at adulthood. I really think the author (or at least the narrative she was trying to push) is that life sucks. I seriously hope that teenagers don’t get ahold of this book and let it taint their view on growing up. Sheesh…
I read this book for my book club, and I expected it to be a witty and funny book about growing up. Instead, it was a series of vignettes that provided an incomplete and snarky view of this selfish woman. It was not funny at all, i…

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