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Friday, November 10, 2017

El Deafo | Cece Bell

And being different? That turned out to the best part of all. I found that with a little creativity, and a lot of dedication, any difference can be turned into something amazing. Our differences are our superpowers.”

Genre: Middle Grade Graphic Novel/Memoir.
Number of Pages: 233.
Perspective: First.
Location: Virginia.

This graphic novel follows the author throughout her time as a young girl in the 1970s and her experiences losing her hearing from meningitis at the age of four. She learns how to make friends and accept herself. For a complete summary, you can go here.

This was a beautiful story about someone who copes with becoming deaf. I took an American Sign Language course in college and we talked a lot about the deaf culture; it was interesting to learn about some of the daily challenges that someone who is deaf faces. This book explains those challenges in a way that children can understand and relate to. We have come a long way with accessibility since the 70s, but we all could use a reminder about acceptance and how to be accommodating to people with disabilities. [Note: not all deaf people consider being deaf a disability]. 

The comics were colorful and lovely. I think this book would be perfect for someone in middle school, even though the main character is in elementary school. There are some cultural things from the 70s, such as teachers smoking cigarettes at school, that may be shocking for some parents to see in a children’s comic book. But I think all children will find something in the story that they can relate to. 

I think both children and adults will love this story. I think it would be a great book for a parent and child to read together and discuss. I even gave this book my Best Book Award! If you are interested in buying the book, you can buy it here. After you have read it, leave a comment and let me know what you think! 




“Oh, why do I even care what other people think?”